PDF Across the Land and the Water: Selected Poems, 1964-2001

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Across the Land and the Water: Selected Poems, 1964-2001 file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Across the Land and the Water: Selected Poems, 1964-2001 book. Happy reading Across the Land and the Water: Selected Poems, 1964-2001 Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Across the Land and the Water: Selected Poems, 1964-2001 at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Across the Land and the Water: Selected Poems, 1964-2001 Pocket Guide.
Across the Land and the Water book. Read 35 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. A publishing landmark—the first major collection of p.
Table of contents

And yet Sebald manages such movement with a lightness of touch Even in a seemingly simple six-line poem, the sudden weight of historical events can be felt. What would a noble literary enterprise look like? One of the few answers available to English-speaking readers is the work of W. He is an addiction, and once buttonholed by his books, you have neither the wish nor the will to tear yourself away.

Selected Poems, 1964-2001

He studied German language and literature in Freiburg, Switzerland, and Manchester. He taught at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England, for thirty years, becoming professor of European literature in , and from to was the first director of the British Centre for Literary Translation. He died in December Iain Galbraith was born in Glasgow in and studied modern languages and comparative literature at the universities of Cambridge, Freiburg, and Mainz, where he taught for several years.

He has edited works by Stevenson, Hogg, Scott, Boswell, and Conrad, and contributed essays to many books and journals in the U. He is a widely published translator of German-language writing, especially poetry, into English, winning the John Dryden Prize for Literary Translation in Toggle navigation. New to eBooks. How many copies would you like to buy? To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Categories

To ask other readers questions about Across the Land and the Water , please sign up. Be the first to ask a question about Across the Land and the Water. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Community Reviews.

Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Sep 19, Jon athan Nakapalau rated it it was amazing Shelves: cultural-studies , favorites , poetry. Several of my German speaking friends have told me about the singular poetry of Sebald, but it has been very hard to find his poems translated in English.

This book has opened a new 'poetry door' for me; simple yet complex observations that seem in constant motion - taking you along the current of life. Will look for more works by this unique poet.

Selected Poems by Robert Frost (FULL Audiobook)

Oct 11, Jonfaith rated it liked it Shelves: poetshere. Rather than greater virtue the happy ending proposes more trivial vices Sebald gave the world sparse allusions, which appear to sprout from our blunted sense of history into something solitary yet profound. These poems are restless, suggesting a rugged terrain, a mackintosh and perhaps a paperback in the back pocket.

Donne or Eckermann. Irony it is said Is a form of humility There's a deprecation at play when one is immersed in erudition. That choice demands a steep cost. Prudent to bring proper shoe Rather than greater virtue the happy ending proposes more trivial vices Sebald gave the world sparse allusions, which appear to sprout from our blunted sense of history into something solitary yet profound.

Prudent to bring proper shoes. The impulses which harangue are only to be exacerbated. Jul 13, Parrish Lantern rated it really liked it Shelves: review-copies , pomesallsizes , auto-faction , netgalley. Unlike a lot of people whose introduction to the writing of W. Sebald was through books such as Rings of Saturn, Austerlitz, or Vertigo, mine was through the Micropoems in Unrecounted, a slim volume of thirty three poems, with accompanying lithographs by Jan Peter Tripp.

So when I saw this Selected poems at NetGalley my curiosity was piqued and I requested it wondering whether without the pictures the poetry featured would be as hermetic or whether the act of trying to match the image with the Unlike a lot of people whose introduction to the writing of W. So when I saw this Selected poems at NetGalley my curiosity was piqued and I requested it wondering whether without the pictures the poetry featured would be as hermetic or whether the act of trying to match the image with the poem was the lock that forbade admittance.

Published a decade after his death, this anthology pulls together poetry from various periods of his life. On duty on a stretch in the alpine foothills the railway clerk considers the essence of the tear-off calendar. Nov 04, M. Sarki rated it it was ok. Nothing much to say about this book other than Sebald's own wish to remembered for his prose. These bits were mostly just pen put to paper, a recording of words more reportage than anything resembling fine poetry. Apr 16, Stephen rated it it was amazing. Sebald is kind a melancholy German version of Jorge Luis Borges.

Like Borges, a fellow bibliophile, he was drawn to writing about arcane old books that almost nobody else reads anymore, or to topics like firebombings in German memory, or the back roads of Corsica that might be deliberately overlooked by a calculated amnesia. Like Borges, too, he was mostly known for his prose but was a killer poet.

His poems should be read with the notes at the end of this book, which are a fascinating look at Sebald is kind a melancholy German version of Jorge Luis Borges.


  • The Skull Throne (Demon Cycle, Book 4)!
  • Cisco Unity Connection (Networking Technology: IP Communications)!
  • Getting StartED with Mac OS X Leopard!

His poems should be read with the notes at the end of this book, which are a fascinating look at the sources of this enigmatic gold mine. Sebald had a voracious hunger for unusual bits of history, folklore, and scattered poetry in old books and paintings. Which other recent European writers would mine the Quaker "naive" painter Edward Hicks for poetry?

Which would be so captivated by the language of an American Shaker abecedarium of ? Sebald goes down well-known and little-known paths. He traces Kafka's footsteps, for sure -- then we find him quoting an obscure 17th-century Jesuit who invented an early form of braille, or astronomers, or botanists. The second part of After Nature , another fabulous book of poetry by Sebald, is about the German naturalist Georg Steller, who went with Vitus Bering to Siberia and Alaska in the s and died in misery there. I love that Sebald mines this man's abysmal subarctic fate for another delicious ounce of his characteristically melancholy perspective on the world -- which never annoys, since Sebald's melancholy, even when private, is thickly woven around other people's miseries, vicarious experience and tragedies that he latches onto to express some of his own perspective on life, and therefore is far more interesting than the yawningly self-reflexive ache of most contemporary poetry.

Yet like Borges' poetry, the "personality" of Sebald's sadness is not only based on academic, bookish wanderings, but transfixes in a way not ultimately intellectual. Sebald famously seeds some red-blooded emotion into what could have turned into distanced literary criticism or mere travelogue. And his poems take anything but a back seat to his better-known prose. The poetry and prose come from the same fantastics and often overlooked sources. The titles alone are riveting. And this, from "Trigonometry of the Spheres" like the German Romantic Novalis, Sebald is a great poet of the night : "And once he said do not forget the north wind brings light from the house of Aries to the apple trees" Apr 16, jeremy rated it really liked it Shelves: translation , poetry.

Mar 15, Nikki rated it really liked it Shelves: poetry , Apr 07, Cooper Renner rated it it was amazing. Books of lyric poetry are very rarely 5 star books--it's simply too hard to write a first-rate lyric poem. But this is a collection of poems written over several decades--a selected poems--and Sebald was a rather astonishing writer. And, perhaps as much to the point, when one "compares a book against others of its type," this is clearly a superior collection. Austere, restrained, observant: not Dickinson generally likely to take the top of your head off, but still lovely in its way.

Aug 31, Andrew added it Shelves: poetry , w-g-sebald. If Across the Land and Water had been a late '90s hip-hop album, it would have been called "W. Sebald: Da Resurrection," collecting odds and ends from his early career, post-mortem. And, q. Biggie on Born Again, it mixes outright bangers with a few half-thoughts, and it's nothing like his fully thought-out masterpieces.

https://gebdarsvalhocon.cf/southwest.php

Across the Land and the Water: Selected Poems, by W.G. Sebald

But it's still got that moody, archival, neurasthenic Sebald vibe I love so much, even if it is in a condensed and fragmented form. This is more than just poetry. Way more. It is wandering. It is traveling. It is a lesson in history. In art. In language. It is almost photography.

I dare say Sebald wasn't a poet. He did not write poems And wrote them down. View 2 comments. Apr 30, Nathan Albright rated it it was amazing Shelves: challenge Having previously seen that W. Sebald could handle longer poems with considerable skill, I read this book hoping that he could handle shorter poems as well and I was definitely pleased with the results. Even though these poems are mostly translations from German, they still work as poems.

Some of the poems are fairly long, though nowhere as near as long as the poems from After Nature.


  • Across the Land and the Water by W.G. Sebald: | kupukoviqe.tk: Books!
  • Blooms Morning.
  • These Things Hidden.
  • Search form.

And some of the poems are tantalizingly short, like this one, "Obscure Passage:" Aristole did not apprehend Having previously seen that W. And some of the poems are tantalizingly short, like this one, "Obscure Passage:" Aristole did not apprehend at all the word he found in Archytas When one is dealing with thoughtful poetry like this [1], one has to recognize the depth of allusions that are being made by the poet.

Here the author is making a reference to classical views about the limitations of hearing, limitations that Aristotle did not admit of in his view of human wisdom and understanding.


  • Economic Thought and Political Theory!
  • Most Popular.
  • Across the Land and the Water.

At other times the poet writes what appears to be a beautiful nature ode only to leave a reference to concentration camps from Hitler's Germany in the area, turning a nature ode into a darker reflection on the relationship of history and memory and poetry. These are great works, and as my library has more books of his, I expect to read plenty more where this came from. This book of about pages or so of poetry is divided into several sections. Indeed, given the title of the sections, it is possible that the parts of this book are chapbooks or at least could have been with the poems inside them as part of some collection that was never made in English until this time.

This book has the feel of a best-of compilation in the best way, with poems relating to history, philosophy, travel, creation, memory, and other concerns that seem particularly typical from what I have read of the poet thus far.

Across the Land and the Water: Selected Poems, 1964-2001

The author shows himself to have been very well-read and also someone who thought and reflected about his place in the world and his country's place in the world, and the inherited guilt of history lies heavily on him in these pages as well, which appears to be a consistent element of Sebald's writing. A couple of examples suffice to point out the deep resonance of the author's shorter works of lyrical poetry. For one, the author appears to be deeply involved in conversations about other creative people--there are references to Chopin's doomed romance with a lovely young lady whose father overruled their engagement, at least a couple of references to Kafka, one to Chekov's death.

Clearly, Sebald is someone who recognizes his part of the conversation that writers engage in with other writers, and he is playful in writing in such a way that other well-read people can grasp at the depth of what is being said. The author also mentions German history quite frequently here, and on at least a few occasions there are references to the horrors of World War II. Sebald just cannot seem to shake the dark sense of how even the bucolic German countryside contains numerous places that have been forever? One wonders how much time is necessary for the land to rest to become pure again, as nature is consistently malign in these poems, always full of some kind of darker angle or reference than the idea most people have when it comes to nature poems.